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Artists Talking About Their Experience of Curating

I see curating as an inquisitive exploration; projects often evolving organically through chance connections. I work in collaboration with artists, but not as their agent. My approach is in favour of inclusivity and experimentation, often showcasing artists without exhibition experience, alongside established practitioners.” Read more from Juan Bolivar

About 18 years ago I did not see any Chinese names in the galleries I was looking at. It meant curating for me was driven by a focus that I needed to take control and adapt to my reality to survive as an artist and to show with other like minded people I respected. The freedom to do what you wanted was fun and curating created hubs of visibility for art strengthened by the dialogue of different works. It deepened the understanding of other artist’s works and was essentially collective action with the culture we were part of rather than waiting for an opportunity to find you.” Read more from Gordon Cheung

My name is Richard Ducker and apparently I’m an artist-curator. It could be worse of course, but this is of somewhat of a grey area: am I an artist-curator, curator-artist, artist and curator, an artist who sporadically curates, or vice versa, or just a pretentious arse asking too many questions about doing what many others have done before. Well, pretentious arse I may be, but there are serious questions here that this exhibition proposal raises, as it is often the case that the artist-curator (whatever that might mean) is perceived differently from how they see themselves….” Read more from Richard Ducker

I do not see myself as an opinion maker. I am more affected by others and absorb their opinions and ideas without even realising. I once made a work which relied heavily on a work a friend had made previously and I had no idea for years. Working to facilitate artists in the past was a learning experience for me. I was not curating to use others art to express my opinions. As an artist assisting other artists I was trying to understand how they worked and what they thought and felt. If we managed to present that then it was a success…” Read more from Matt Hale

Curating develops an opportunity to formulate a taste or share an opinion that otherwise would have no voice. These opportunities also allow a context to comment on or within. It can promote an understanding through invitation and introduction, whilst expanding the circles that artists work within…” Read more from James Hopkins

My name is Iavor Lubomirov and I curated my first show just after dropping out of art school. At the time I was looking for a way to exhibit my work as well as thinking about the work of my then quite small peer-group and trying to understand how or whether we fit together. As curating has come to occupy a larger share of my time since then, it has also shifted in meaning and focus, moving away from concerns about my own work and engaging more deeply with the work of others…”Read more from Iavor Lubomirov

Being an artist and curator for me is a symbiotic relationship, where the two practices creatively reciprocate each other. I have found that my own development as an artist has grown as a result of working directly with other artists. Exposure to their personal approaches and the discussing of ideas and methods continues to open up new and interesting projects and collaborations, different to if I worked solely as an artist.” Read more from Bella Easton

My preference as an artist, curator and viewer is usually for the kind of art that comes from the heart, rather than the head. There are many artists who, in my mind, share a certain sensibility. This sensibility is difficult to pin down; it involves a very fine balance of honesty, the darkly comic, the grotesque, and a kind of oddity or eccentricity in its execution; it could be composed in diverse forms and media. In my view these related works are rarely exhibited within the same context. Curating is therefore a way for me to see those dialogues realised…” Read more from Kate Lyddon

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